Make Your Study Easier

Studying at University can be very different from high school, and you should improve your academic skills and learn where to go for information and support. The following services are available to you for free.

The Learning Hub (Academic Language and Learning)

To develop skills in writing, research, time management, exam preparation, group work, presentations, or critical thinking,  check the resources from the Learning Hub. There are online modules, as well as workshops in person and online. You can also book an individual consultation with one of their teachers.

There are also peer-facilitated programs, including workshops for international students from non-English speaking backgrounds to improve their English skills and make connections, and workshops to help all students break assignments into achievable chunks.

The Learning Hub (Mathematics)

To improve your ability to understand or use mathematics in your first year maths subjects, the Mathematics Learning Hub offers:

  • Self-access resources and modules
  • Bridging courses in mathematics and statistics
  • Workshops and supplementary tutorials
  • One-to-one individual assistance by drop-in or by appointment

This is not just for Math majors or minors, it’s for anyone who uses mathematics in their degree.

Getting the most out of the Uni libraries

The University Library, whether online or on campus, is a great resource for all students. They offer support for international students, and can help with exam preparation, library orientation, assignment support, referencing guides, and more.

Study Groups – be aware of academic honesty

Finding a group of people from your course to study with is a popular strategy. Study groups can be a great way to make new friends and connections in your degree, while also improving your knowledge of course content.

However, the University’s Academic Honesty rules make a distinction between legitimate cooperation, and collusion that breaches academic integrity rules. The SRC has assisted a number of students with academic honesty allegations arising from shared notes and study groups. We recommend reading this short article from the Uni website to make sure you are aware of the line between collusion, and legitimate cooperation.

What other support is available?

There are also faculty-specific options for assistance. The library offers drop-in sessions for students to help with specific questions about research and referencing in your faculty.

If you want to talk about your degree structure and unit of study selection, you can contact an Academic Advisor from your faculty or discipline.

If you have questions about the Uni and you’re not sure where to go, you can contact the SRC’s Caseworkers by emailing help@src.usyd.edu.au and we will do our best to connect you with the right place.