Welcome to the Big House… (well, not in a prison kind of way)…

It doesn’t matter how big your school was, it was not as big as this place.  This place even has its own postcode, which makes it even bigger than the Rooty Hill RSL.  Even the satellite campuses are many times bigger than most high schools.  So whilst adjusting to this change can be exciting and challenging, it can also be down right horrifying.

The workload here is significantly higher than for most high schools.  There is less individual direction and increasingly larger class sizes.  The onus really is on you to stay focused and do lots of work to learn all of the required information.  Most students will tell you that you don’t have to do the readings before tutorials or read all the resources you list in your assignments.  What they won’t tell you is that this is an extremely stressful way of not doing very well at uni.  Being full time at uni is definitely more work than being a full time worker. We don’t mean to alarm you, we’re just telling it like it is. But don’t despair, there are ways to make it work for you.

Studies have shown that if you don’t make some sort of attachment to the uni by about week six you’ll find it very difficult to be successful in your degree. What do we mean by attachment? Your attachment may be that you’ve met some other people who like the same hobbies as you, so check out all of the different clubs and societies available through the Union.  If you get the chance, go through the O-Week stalls so that you can meet them face-to-face and join straight away.  If not, you can also find them online and go along to a meeting.

Your attachment may be your love for the subject material.  Take the time to complete at least the required readings so that the lectures make sense to you.  Attending classes is compulsory for a reason, so save the socialising for another time.  Most people say that doing the reading before attending the class (not to mention paying attention whilst you’re there) makes the exams a lot easier.

Your attachment may be as simple as meeting a new friend or potential new partner.  This is always exciting.  Remember to have (safe, consensual) fun, but don’t neglect the main reason you are here. You are now a University of Sydney student. Embrace it like you would a blossoming new romance.

Remember that most people feel just as nervous and out of place as you do – even the students that have come to USYD already equipped with friends from high school.  The best thing that you can do is to try to be yourself, be
open to meeting new people and having new experiences, and know that if you ever need to talk to someone, USYD has a free counseling service.
Another area of difference to high school is the increase to your own personal freedom.

The University prefers to treat you as an adult.  You are free to make your own decisions about alcohol and other drugs, and sexual activity.

If you have questions about anything to do with these feel free to contact the SRC.  We can always point you in the direction of reliable and non-judgemental information.

Living in Sydney is increasingly difficult for anyone on a limited budget.  Where you live needs to be affordable so you’re not spending more than 10 – 15 hours a week working (for a full time student) to be able to support yourself.  It needs to be stable, so you are not worrying about whether you’ll have somewhere to live next week, or whether your flatmates are going to pay their rent.  It needs to be appropriate.  Some students we have met were sleeping on a balcony in the middle of winter and not getting very much sleep…probably not the best idea they’ve ever had. Exhaustion and illness does not a good student make. Having trouble with accommodation? You guessed it; the SRC can help you out.

Always remember that you are not alone here.  There are lots of people willing to help you settle in.  The trick is to ask.

help@src.usyd.edu.au  |  (02) 9660 5222

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