Paola Ayre, Priya Gupta, Oliver Mackie Pawson

Paola Ayre, Priya Gupta, Oliver Mackie Pawson

Queer Officers

The USYD Queer Action Collective is an autonomous activist group fighting for queer rights of students on campus, and in our broader community.

We are an anti-colonial group working to address the depths and intersections of, and decolonise, mainstream queer activism, and we work with a range of on-campus queer groups as well as community organisations.
Previously, QuAC has been heavily engaged with campaigns such as the Safe Schools program, the Manus refugee crisis, campaigns against sexual assault, and the Marriage Equality campaign.

In 2020, there are many different issues we would like to focus on, from incarceration to the intersections between queerness and the environment. One of our larger campaigns is opposing the Religious Exemptions bill, which would further legitimise and protect queerphobic discrimination and actively harm queer people in our everyday lives. We are also taking action against homophobia by members of Campus Security, and as always, ensuring that campus is as safe and welcoming for queer students as possible.

We hold weekly meetings in the Queerspace during which we collectively decide how best we can support our community and achieve our own political goals. We are also excited to educate ourselves and each other this year, with fun panels, reading groups and film screenings on the (queer) agenda!

Get in touch if you have any questions or want to get involved!
Email: queer.officers@src.usyd.edu.au
Facebook: facebook.com/USYDQueer/
Queerspace: Ground floor, Manning Building

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Fahad Ali discusses the Significance of Mardi Gras

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