Harrassment & Discrimination: Your rights at Uni

“All staff, students and affiliates at the University have a right to work or study in an environment that is free from unlawful harassment and discrimination, and to be treated with dignity and respect, irrespective of their background,
beliefs or culture.”

What is Unlawful Harassment?

The University defines unlawful harassment as any type of behaviour that:

  • the other person does not want; and
  • offends, insults, humiliates or intimidates them; and is either:
    – sexual, or
    – targets them because of their race, sex, pregnancy, marital status, transgender, sexual preference or orientation (including homosexuality, lesbianism, bisexuality and heterosexuality), disability, age, carers’ responsibility, political belief, lack of a political belief, lack of a particular political belief (including trade union activity or lack of it, and student association activity or lack of it), religious belief, lack of a religious belief, and/or lack of a particular religious belief; and
  • that, in the circumstances, a reasonable person should have expected would offend, insult, humiliate, or intimidate.
    This includes actual, potential and perceived (imputed) race, sex, pregnancy, marital status, etc.

Some types of harassment, such as sexual harassment and other forms of physical assault and/or stalking, are also illegal under criminal law. These types of harassment may result in criminal prosecution.

Other types of harassment may not be ‘unlawful’ under anti-discrimination legislation, but may nonetheless contravene the University’s staff and student Codes of Conduct or the University’s Workplace Bullying Prevention Policy and Resolution Procedure.

What is Unlawful Discrimination?

The University defines unlawful discrimination as any practice that makes an unlawful distinction between individuals or groups,
so as to disadvantage some people and advantage others. Discrimination may be ‘direct’ (specifically acting against someone)
or ‘indirect’ (inadvertently acting against someone who has a particular characteristic).

What should you do?

If you think you are being discriminated against or harassed make detailed notes about days and times of the incidents noting any potential witnesses. Your safety is an immediate concern. Talk to an SRC caseworker about how to make a complaint and what possible outcomes there are. Remember that a caseworker can give you an idea of what you can expect without forcing you to take action unless you want to.

Contact us

help@src.usyd.edu.au or call to make an appointment on 9660 5222. We can arrange to meet with you on any campus.

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