Have you come across ads online offering false medical certificates? Has anyone ever suggested you get one to use for Special Consideration? Ever considered making your own medical certificate? If you answered yes or maybe, then our strong advice is DON’T!! Just don’t do it.

Did we mention, this is not a good idea….at all….EVER.

There are a number of other reasons we say this. First and foremost because in creating, buying and/or submitting a false medical certificate you are committing FRAUD. This isn’t just against University rules, it’s also against the law, federal law, and potentially carries the risk of a prison sentence of twelve months, if prosecuted by the police.

Sounds serious right! It is! The University also treats this as Academic Misconduct and is referred to the University’s Registrar who appoints a solicitor to investigate. What may have seemed a quick and harmless way to gain special consideration may suddenly find you suspended for a semester or two, or even at risk of being kicked out of Uni. Think how hard it would be trying to explain to your family why have suddenly stopped attending Uni.

Beware, the University knows there are false medical certificates out there. Your Faculty receives hundreds of medical certificates every semester. They know what to look for, so their ability to identify a medical document that doesn’t look right is pretty high. This might be because the certificate looks unusual, or a high number of medical certificates are coming from the same medical practitioner or practice. Faculties routinely check the authenticity of medical documents with medical practices and practitioners, so submitting false documentation is far from “the perfect crime” and more likely to result in you facing serious misconduct allegations and potential police investigations if the University also decides to refer the matter to the police. Is it really worth it?

If you are stressed or struggling to the point that you even consider obtaining a false medical certificate, your best option is to talk to someone about what’s going on. You could speak to an adviser in your Faculty, a Counsellor at the University’s Counselling and Psychological Services, or an SRC HELP Caseworker. You can help explore other ways you might be able to manage your study load without risking far more serious consequences in the long term.

If you need to see a doctor, but your regular one is not available, look for a medical centre nearby, or attend the casualty unit at your local hospital.  If you are too sick to move you can get an after hours doctor to visit your home.  Check for details on the internet.

To see an SRC Help Caseworker
call 9600 5222 to
make an appointment or
email: help@src.usyd.edu.au

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